Click to open network menu
Join or Log In
Mobafire logo

Join the leading League of Legends community. Create and share Champion Guides and Builds.

Create an MFN Account






Or

's Forum Avatar

Official Happy thread.

Creator: Nighthawk September 9, 2011 1:14pm
2055 posts - page 148 of 206
mastrer1000
<Editor>
mastrer1000's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
4859
Joined:
Jan 3rd, 2013
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 6, 2015 8:33am | Report
I am pretty sure that his followup- question would be something along the lines of "why do you teach in south korea instead of china?"
Vapora Dark
<Perfectionist>
Vapora Dark's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
10491
Joined:
Oct 16th, 2011
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 6, 2015 5:12pm | Report
sirell wrote:


What's that got to do with anything, lol?

I don't think he was being racist (lol), just that he doesn't understand why you would teach in Korea rather than China, as presumably you speak Chinese and English but not Korean as far as we know.

Although I think I remember hearing that Korean English teachers don't actually talk to their students in Korean at all, just English, so it's normal to hire people who don't speak a single word of Korean to teach in English in South Korea.
Jimmydoggga 2.0
<Member>
Jimmydoggga 2.0's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
2308
Joined:
Sep 5th, 2013
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 6, 2015 5:28pm | Report
I was tired and read South Korea as a North Korea.
You know what they say:
ALL HAIL OUR ALMIGHTY AND GLORIOUS LEADER

Basically MOBAFire.
HiFromBuddha
<Member>
HiFromBuddha's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
1153
Joined:
Dec 10th, 2011
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 6, 2015 5:35pm | Report

I don't think he was being racist (lol), just that he doesn't understand why you would teach in Korea rather than China, as presumably you speak Chinese and English but not Korean as far as we know.

Although I think I remember hearing that Korean English teachers don't actually talk to their students in Korean at all, just English, so it's normal to hire people who don't speak a single word of Korean to teach in English in South Korea.


Also, while I'm not sure if this really is the case in Korea for China, but I can at least say that what surprised me last time I was in China was how Chinese schools place emphasis on learning Korean as well as English, primarily for the business prospects in Korea. It could be that alongside the English, the Chinese background might also prove to be really valuable, which must've given him an advantage during the process. I'm just guessing it's a two way street between Chinese and South Korean education systems, do correct me if I'm wrong.

Thank you to MissMaw for the signatures!
sirell
<Member>
sirell's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
5978
Joined:
Apr 30th, 2012
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 6, 2015 7:45pm | Report
Teaching in China is not a prospect that I would particularly look forward too. I am Hong Kong Chinese and there is a certain amount of hostility/tension between Hong Kong and Mainland Chinese. I would not look forward either to the prospect of teaching English in Hong Kong; the working and living conditions are getting continuously worse every year, particularly to natives.

To be honest, I don't really see why my ethnicity would weigh in on my decision to teach in SK rather than China. Teaching ESL in Asian countries is done purely in English and if you do speak Korean, they actually give you orders not to speak in Korean in front of the students. Only some schools look for Korean native teachers and those are the exception to the rule.

The Chinese background is actually detrimental to the recruitment process. I was told by no less than 3 recruiters that the target demographic of recruiting teachers are primarily on 1) Caucasian and 2) Female. Lots of schools prefer to recruit Caucasian teachers because they look the part and then other skin colours that are not easily mistaken for oriental-asians and thus misunderstood to be Korean. Female teachers are also generally more preferred over male teachers, due to their natural rapport with children.
Lugignaf
<Veteran>
Lugignaf's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
10968
Joined:
Feb 8th, 2011
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 6, 2015 8:17pm | Report
Good first day of work today. Here's to hoping for more. :D
Vapora Dark
<Perfectionist>
Vapora Dark's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
10491
Joined:
Oct 16th, 2011
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 7, 2015 6:30am | Report
sirell wrote:
To be honest, I don't really see why my ethnicity would weigh in on my decision to teach in SK rather than China.

Like I said, he didn't know you don't need to speak Korean to teach English in South Korea.
HiFromBuddha
<Member>
HiFromBuddha's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
1153
Joined:
Dec 10th, 2011
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 9, 2015 4:19am | Report
sirell wrote:
The Chinese background is actually detrimental to the recruitment process. I was told by no less than 3 recruiters that the target demographic of recruiting teachers are primarily on 1) Caucasian and 2) Female. Lots of schools prefer to recruit Caucasian teachers because they look the part and then other skin colours that are not easily mistaken for oriental-asians and thus misunderstood to be Korean. Female teachers are also generally more preferred over male teachers, due to their natural rapport with children.


That's actually really interesting. I don't really know enough about the subject to talk more about it, sadly, other than some guesses from my observations at schools in China.
Imma 'bout to end this man's whole career
My rather unimpressive and slowly growing anime list!
Currently watching:
    Kiniro Mosaic
Currently Reading:
    Utsuro no Hako to Zero Maria
    Nisekoi: False Love
ri]
Imma 'bout to end this man's whole career
My rather unimpressive and slowly growing anime list!
Currently watching:
    Kiniro Mosaic
Currently Reading:
    Utsuro no Hako to Zero Maria
    Nisekoi: False Love
sirell
<Member>
sirell's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
5978
Joined:
Apr 30th, 2012
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 9, 2015 7:05am | Report

That's actually really interesting. I don't really know enough about the subject to talk more about it, sadly, other than some guesses from my observations at schools in China.


It honestly depends where you're applying to. A lot of business language schools might look for English and Mandarin teachers because that's just economically where the world is beginning to lean. Some schools prefer Korean native teachers that are fluent in English. There are also religiously based schools (usually Catholic) that look for a Christian English teachers.

But for the general public school applications, the target demographic for hire is Caucasians and females, though Korean natives fluent in English are also very niche.
Janitsu
<Moderator>
Janitsu's Forum Avatar
Show more awards
Posts:
8829
Joined:
Jul 3rd, 2011
Permalink | Quote | PM | +Rep November 9, 2015 8:00am | Report
Yeah sorry Sirell, didn't mean to be rude but for a Finn it sounds weird that the teacher only speaks the other language.

Here you have to be fluent in the native tongue (Finnish) and in the language you are teaching (Swedish/French/German/English/Russian primarily in Finland)

Thanks to OwenTheAwesomer for the signature =)

You need to log in before commenting.

League of Legends Champions:

Teamfight Tactics Guide